Spanish

The Spanish Language Program (SLP) at Duke University has designed courses to develop all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. The SLP includes Elementary Spanish 101 and 102, Intermediate Spanish 203 and Advanced Intermediate Spanish 204. The 300-level courses specialize in writing, grammar, and speaking skills in the following courses: Advanced Spanish Writing 301, Advanced Spanish Grammar 302, and Introduction to Cultural Studies 303. Spanish 306-308 carry a special emphasis on cultural and social issues. Our elementary and intermediate courses are taught following a task-based second language teaching approach. The ultimate goal is to have students be able to communicate in Spanish depending on the context and specific situations they encounter in authentic or real life situations. Our advanced courses (301-304) focus both on the development of specific language skills as well as on the reflection of different thematic content.

The course description and placement guidelines that follow should help you choose the proper gateway course given your background. Be aware in particular that your records will be reviewed to verify your eligibility for Spanish 101 and Spanish 111, since you may not enroll in either of these courses if you have had more than two years of Spanish in high school. Also keep in mind that if you have taken an AP test or SAT II test (with or without listening), you should use that score as your guide for selecting a course.

If you have this background and/or test scores:

You should take this course:

Elementery Courses - 100 Level Courses

  • You have two years (or less) of high school Spanish. ATTENTION: If you have 3 (or more) years of high school Spanish, you MUST enroll in Spanish 102 or above
  • You have a score of 370 or lower on the SATII
  • You did not read any texts in Spanish

Spanish 101: Elementary Spanish introduces the basic elements of the language and includes exposure to some aspects of Spanish-speaking cultures. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills receive equal attention. This course meets 5 times a week. It covers present tense, present perfect, present progressive and the morphology (forms) of the past tenses. It introduces students to Spanish-speaking cultures through readings, audio texts and other authentic materials. Students read 2 stories of about 550 words each.

Your records will be reviewed the first week of classes to verify your eligibility. If you have too much previous experience you will be dropped from Spanish 101.

  • You have completed more than two years of high school Spanish
  • You have successfully completed Spanish 101 or its equivalent at the university level
  • You have a score of 380-450 on the SATII
  • You have covered material pertaining to Spanish 101
Spanish 102: Second semester of elementary Spanish continues with the introduction of the basic elements of Spanish. This course builds on the elements of the language acquired in Elementary Spanish 101. It covers the past tenses (preterit and imperfect), past progressive, the future tense, commands and an introduction to the present subjunctive. It also studies the direct and indirect object pronouns and possessive pronouns. It exposes students to Spanish-speaking cultures through readings, audio texts and other authentic materials. Students read 2 stories of about 1000 words each. Keep in mind that the Duke in Mexico summer Program offers an intensive immersion experience to complete Spanish I and II.
  • You have never studied Spanish
  • You have maximum of one year of high school Spanish
  • You have very little contact with a Spanish-speaking environment
Spanish 111: This is an intensive course; it covers the basic elementary language curriculum (Spanish 101 and 102) in one semester, targeted to students with none or very little experience in Spanish.

Intermediate Courses - 200 Level Courses

  • You have successfully completed Spanish 102
  • You have a score of 460-580 on the SATII, or a score 3 on the AP exam (language or literature)
  • You have studied Spanish for at least 2 years in high school and have covered material pertaining to Spanish 102
Spanish 203: Spanish 203 is the third semester Spanish course. This course is for students who have successfully completed Spanish 102 or its equivalent. The course includes a complete review of elementary grammar (everything covered in Spanish 101 and 102), past subjunctive, pluperfect tenses, application of reading strategies to progressively longer authentic texts, and regular speaking practice. There is a continued development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing with attention to expanding the range and complexity of grammar usage and vocabulary through exposure to Spanish-speaking cultures. Reading assignments at end of course are equivalent to a 100-150-page novel (not adapted for classroom use). Keep in mind that the Duke in Mexico summer Program offers an intensive immersion experience to complete Spanish 203 and 204.

 

  • You have successfully completed Spanish 203
  • You have a score of 590-650 on the SATII, or a score 4 on the AP language exam
  • You have studied Spanish for at least 2 years in high school and have covered material pertaining to Spanish 203
Spanish 204: This is the fourth semester Spanish course. This course is for students who have successfully completed Spanish 203 or its equivalent. Spanish 204 includes a complete review of basic intermediate level grammar, expansion of pronominal constructions, discourse connectors, and a range of conversational strategies. There is further development of the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. With emphasis on various writing tasks students expand their range and sophistication of grammar usage and vocabulary and exposure to Spanish-speaking cultures. Students build comprehension and produce texts of greater extension and complexity. This course prepares students for 300-level Spanish courses through literary texts and other media (film, news, short essays, cartoons, etc.). Reading assignments at the end of course are equivalent to a 150-200-page novel (not adapted for classroom use).

Advanced Courses - 300 Level Courses

  • You have completed Spanish 204 or its equivalent
  • You have a score of 660+ on the SATII, or a score 4 on the AP literature exam; or a 5 in the language AP exam
  • You have studied Spanish for at least 3 years in high school and have covered material pertaining to Spanish 204
  • You learned Spanish outside the classroom but Spanish is not your dominant language
  • You are a native speaker of Spanish and it is your dominant language-- As a native speaker of Spanish you should consider enrolling in Spanish 331S: Introduction to Literature, Film, and Popular Culture or higher. If you feel that you want either grammar or writing skill development you may consider enrolling in Spanish 301: Advanced Spanish Writing or Spanish 302: Advanced Grammar. You are not eligible to enroll in Spanish 105: Discourse Strategies through Politics, Culture, and Society

Spanish 301: Advanced Spanish Writing Development of composition skills related to expository and other forms of writing, focus on techniques for organizing information, vocabulary, editing, revising, rewriting and grammatical accuracy. Substantial work on the development of writing strategies through several short papers and a final long paper. This course is strongly recommended before enrollment in literature classes in Spanish.

Spanish 302: Advanced Spanish Grammar Intended to foster students' reflection about Spanish grammar and to consolidate students' knowledge of the system of rules underlying the Spanish languages. Special attention given to grammar in oral and written communication. Not open to students who have previously taken both Spanish 301 and 303.

Spanish 303: Introduction to Cultural Studies builds effective strategies for oral communication. Use of language ranges from informal to formal situations and concrete to abstract topics. Focus on developing structured arguments and increasing linguistic accuracy. Not open to students who have previously taken both Spanish 101 and 104 or Native Speakers of Spanish.

Spanish 306: Health, Culture and the Latino Community Issues associated with access to the health care industry for growing Latino/a population in the US. Topics: cultural competency issues, medical practices, lexical knowledge related to the field. Students will engage in experiential learning through contact with teh local community. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and participation in service. Recommended students take one 300-level Spanish course prior to enrolling. Pre-requisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent.

Spanish 307S: Issues of Education and Immigration Community-based interaction with Durham Public Schools. Topics: Latino/a identity, access to education for immigrants, academic performance, assimilation, general pressures of family and peers, bilingualism, configurations of ethno-racial consciousness. Required 20 hours outside of class with assigned community partners. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, and participation in service. Recommended students take one 300-level Spanish course prior to enrolling. Pre-requisite: Spanish 204 or equivalent.

Spanish 308S: Latino/a Voices in Duke, Durham, and Beyond Formation of Latino/a identity(ies) and community voices through the lens of cultural, political, and social issues at local and national level. Topics: Minority voices, power and class, linguistic and artistic expression. Required 20 hours outside of class working with the community. Assessment on knowledge of content, oral and written Spanish, service. Recommended students take one 300-level Spanish course prior to enrolling.

 

Guidelines for Receiving Transfer Credit

Transferring a language course to Duke from another institution may involved up to three separate steps:

  1. Obtaining course credit which counts towards fulfilling th 34 courses required for graduation,
  2. Obtaining Mode of Inquiry FL (Foreign Language) coding which counts towards fulfilling your language requirement, and
  3. Determining the next language course you need to take at Duke to fulfill your language requirement (if it is not completed by the transfer course).

NOTE: Obtaining Spanish 100 (888) or Spanish 300 (999) credit toward the 34 courses required for graduation does not automatically mean the course will also receive the Mode of Inquiry FL code. Likewise, obtaining a Mode of Inquiry FL code for a transfer course does not automatically mean that you will be prepared to successfully complete a Spanish course at Duke at a higher level.

Procedure

1. Prior to taking the transfer course:

a. Familiarize yourself with the procedures for transferring a course for credit given on the Trinity Requirements web site. If you intend to request a FL coding for the transfer course in Spanish, also familiarize yourself with the requirements given in parts 2 and 3 below.

b. In order to transfer to Duke and count as one course credit toward your graduation, the first requirement is that the Spanish course must not have fewer contact hours than the equivalent course taught on campus at Duke. A Duke language course contact hour is no less than 50 minutes.

  • Minimum required contact hours:
  • Spanish 101: 70
  • Spanish 102: 70
  • Spanish 111: 112
  • Spanish 203: 42
  • Spanish 204: 42
  • Spanish 300 and above: 42

c. In addition to fulfilling the contact hour requirement, Spanish courses that are to be transferred for elective credit must meet the following specific minimum requirements:

  • All coursework and class discussion in Spanish, unless seeking course equivalency for the course in translation.
  • Substantive linguistic and cultural content.
  • Class size must not exceed 20 students.

NOTE: Student with three years or more of High School Spanish must not request transfer credit for Spanish 101. Student with more than 1 year of High School Spanish must not request transfer credit for Spanish 111.

d. Obtain a copy of the course description and any other documentation needed to show that the transfer course meets these minimum requirements.

e. Download the Transfer Course Approval Form from the T-Reqs web site and fill out the top of the form. Bring the form, the calculation for part b, and the documentation for part c to the Assistant to the DUS in Romance Studies, Mr. Dell Williams  in Languages 107. If approved, the course will be listed on the form as an elective course in Spanish. (Spanish 100 will be used to designate an elective course at the introductory or intermediate level and Spanish 300 will be used to designate an elective course at the advanced level.)

f. Take the signed form and documentation to the office of your academic dean for final approval. Upon approval, the dean will send the form to the Registrar.

2. While taking the transfer course:

If you may later want to request that the transfer course count toward fulfilling your Duke language requirement, you should save all the course materials such as the syllabus, textbooks, papers written, quizzes, exams, etc.

3. After taking the transfer course:

a. Assuming satisfactory completion of the course with a grade of C- or better, request that the Registrar of the institution you attended send a copy of your transcript to the Registrar of Duke University, Box 90054, Durham, NC, 27708. Upon receipt of your dean's approval and the transcript showing successful completion of the course, the Registrar will add the transfer course to your Duke transcript as Spanish 100 (888) or Spanish 300 (999).

b. If you want the transfer course to count toward fulfilling your Duke language requirement, you must request that the transfer course be granted the foreign language Mode of Inquiry code, FL.

  • See part c, below, for requirements for FL Mode of Inquiry credit for an elementary or intermediate Spanish course.
  • See part d, below, for requirement for FL Mode of Inquiry credit for an advanced level Spanish course (Spanish 301 or higher).

c. For a course that was approved for transfer to Duke by the DUS in Romance Studies and your academic dean with a course number of Spanish 888, the requirement for obtaining a FL code is that the transfer course must be equivalent to the corresponding Duke language course. The requirements for establishing equivalency are given below.

General requirements:

  1. Language Modalities: Speaking, writing, listening, reading, culture.
  2. Teaching Methodology: Communicative, content based approach; language use in context; use of authentic materials; use of audio and video for development of listening comprehension; regular assignments that focus on writing as a process. Cultural component integrated into teaching and assessment practices.
  3. Writing component: At least 2 formal compositions in Spanish 101, 102, 203 and 204. All composition assignments must include at least one revision stage. Length of compositions for Spanish 101 should be one page, for Spanish 102 is 1 page and 1 page and a half; Spanish 203 and Spanish 204 is 2 pages. In addition to the formal compositions, the course should include at least 4 informal writing assignments such as electronic forum, journals, etc. Emphasis on developing competency in diverse registers and text types.
  4. Evaluation: For Spanish 101-204, student should be evaluated on all language modalities: two major tests, one midterm, and comprehensive final exam; 2 oral exams.
  5. Reading: Student should be exposed to extensive reading. Adapted reading for Spanish 101, 102, and 111; original readings for Spanish 203, 204.
  6. Class size must not exceed 20 students.

Course-specific requirements:

  1. Spanish 101 must cover at least half of traditional elementary textbook (including present and past tenses, direct and indirect object pronouns).
  2. Spanish 102 must complete the study of a traditional elementary textbook (including future tenses, conditional and subjunctive moods, conjunctions, prepositions, relative pronouns).
  3. Spanish 111 must include everything covered in Spanish 101 and 102 (above)
  4. Spanish 203 must include a complete review of elementary grammar (everything covered in Spanish 101 and 102), application of reading strategies to progressively longer authentic texts, and regular speaking practice. Reading assignments at end of course must be equivalent to a 100-150 page novel (not adapted for classroom use).
  5. Spanish 204 must include a complete review of basic intermediate level grammar, discussion of a diversity of literary texts and other media (film, news, short essays, cartoons, etc.). Reading assignments at end of course must be equivalent to a 150-200 page novel (not adapted for classroom use).

d. For a course that was approved for transfer to Duke by the DUS of Romance Studies and your academic dean with a course number of Spanish 300 (999), the requirements for obtaining a FL code are given below:

  • Reading: Student in literature or culture course should be exposed to extensive reading of original (rather than adapted) texts.
  • Spanish 301 must include extensive work in advanced Spanish grammar and some stylistics. Emphasis on developing competency in diverse registers and text types through process writing. Daily writing assignments, two exams on grammar and reading topics, five compositions and a final 6-7 page paper.
  • Spanish 302 must include a study in depth of Spanish morphology and syntax. Emphasis should be given to the reflection of grammar usage in real contexts. Evaluation in this course should include at least three 3- 4 page papers on a grammar issue.
  • Spanish 303 must include extensive work in oral production. Emphasis on developing oral competency in diverse registers. Daily oral assignments, and one major presentation on a socio-cultural or socio-political aspect of any Spanish speaking country.

In addition the minimum number of contact hours, transfer course syllabus, type and amount of required work, and evaluation methods must be equivalent to those of specific Duke Spanish course for which student is seeking credit.

e. If the transfer course fulfills the requirements for the FL code given in part c or d above, download the Form for Requesting Modes of Inquiry Coding from the T-Reqs web site. Complete the form and submit it with the necessary documentation as directed on that form.

f. If the transfer course is granted a Mode of Inquiry FL code, the FL code will be added to the course on your Duke Advisement Report. (Note: Modes of Inquiry designations do not appear your transcript.)

g. A course that was approved as Spanish 300 (999) will be left unchanged on your Duke transcript; however, a course that was approved for transfer as Spanish 100 (888) will be changed on your Duke transcript to its equivalent Duke course number which means that you cannot repeat/take the equivalent Duke course to earn an additional letter grade, course credit, or FL code.

4. After receiving a Mode of Inquiry FL code for a transfer course:

a. If the FL code fulfills your language requirement in Spanish at Duke, then no further action is necessary.

b. If the FL code is not the last one you need in order to complete your language requirement in Spanish at Duke, contact the Director of the Spanish Language Program, Liliana Paredes, to schedule a placement interview. The interview will be used to determine your preparedness for the next course in the Spanish Language Program sequence.

Online Resources

Duke Libraries Latin American & Caribbean Studies resources - http://guides.library.duke.edu/latinamericanstudies

Tutoring

Students currently enrolled in the Spanish Language Program (SLP) courses at Duke University have six options for receiving out-of-class language skill assistance:

  1. Currently enrolled Spanish students may visit their Instructors during office hours to review material and receive individualized explanations. Office hours are listed  on your Blackboard site.
  2. The Instructor in a Spanish course may refer a currently enrolled student to a SLP tutor, which will allow the students to schedule a weekly appointment. Once referred, it is the student’s responsibility to schedule and keep appointments with the tutors. This is a free service. For tutoring schedules see below.
  3. Currently enrolled students may seek extra support by working with a SLP tutor on a walk-in basis. The tutor will work 15-30 minutes with the students when the tutor’s schedule permits. Review the schedule below and walk-in to see if the tutor is available at that time. This is a free service.
  4. Spanish 101-204 students may sign up for Peer Tutoring with the Academic Resource Center.  This is a free service.  
  5. All Duke students may participate in the Club Pura Vida: a SLP sponsored club for students who want to practice their Spanish skills while cooking, dancing, etc. .
  6. Any student may hire a tutor. Contact Pat McPherson for names of private tutors.

Eligibility:

  • Spanish 101-204 students are eligible for weekly 30 minute sessions with SLP course tutors
  • Spanish 203-204 students have the option for weekly 30 minute sessions with SLP writing tutors
  • Spanish 303 students are eligible for weekly 15 minute sessions with SLP course tutors
  • Spanish 301, 302, 305, 306 and higher are eligible for weekly 30 minute sessions with SLP writing tutors

Tutoring Schedule

Tutoring takes place at 2016 Campus Drive and in the Languages Buidling, Rm. 218.

Location

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

2016 Campus Drive - Morning/noon

Time
Tutor Name
Email
Rooom Location

     
2016 Campus Drive - Afternoon  

Time
Tutor Name
Email
Rooom Location

 

Time
Tutor Name
Email
Rooom Location

2016 Campus Drive - Evening    

Time
Tutor Name
Email
Rooom Location

 
218 Languages Building

Time
Tutor Name
Email
Rooom Location

Time
Tutor Name
Email
Rooom Location

   

Volunteer Opportunities with Local Organizations

There are many local organizations that work with the Latino/a population in Durham. Volunteers are encouraged to contact these organizations directly to see what types of commitment they require and the types of jobs they offer.

Duke Language Labs

  • 114 Languages Building (West Campus)
  • 101 Carr Building (East Campus)

Duke Global Education Office

Several programs offered through the Duke University Global Education Office for Undergraduates are jointly administered by the Department of Romance Studies, have faculty and staff participants in the programs, or involve a substantial Spanish language component. Please see the Global Education links below for the following programs:

There are also many other global education programs available that are administered by other organizations. See the Global Education Office website.

DukeEngage

DukeEngage provides one-time funding for Duke undergraduates who wish to pursue an immersive (minimum of eight weeks) service experience by meeting a community need locally, domestically or internationally. The program currently features multiple international programs in Spanish-speaking countries:

 

 
missing portrait

Zully Amaya, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish

Office: 107 Bell Tower #1

Campus Box: Campus Box 90269

Phone: (919) 684-0754

Full Profile »

missing portrait

Eileen M Anderson, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish

Office: 2016 Campus Drive, Office #101

Campus Box: Box 90269

Phone: 919-684-4654

Fax: 919-684-9655

Full Profile »

missing portrait

Xiomara Campilongo, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish

Phone: (919) 684-0464

Full Profile »

Joan E Clifford, Lecturer, Spanish; Service-Learning Faculty Consultant and Director of Community-Based Language Intitiatives

Office: 2016 Campus Drive, #206

Campus Box: 90269

Phone: (919) 684-0774

Fax: (919) 684-9655

Full Profile »

Alma Coefman Cabeza, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish

Office: 2016 Campus Drive, Office #106

Campus Box: 90269

Phone: (919) 660-3100

Fax: 919-684-9655

Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays from 9.45 until 10.15 and by appointment.

Alma Coefman received a Master in Hispanic and Latin American Literature from the University of Alberta (Edmonton, Canada). Her research interests include the influence of postmodernist ideas on contemporary Argentinean literature, and she has investigated this question focusing on the work of Rodolfo Enrique Fogwill. She is also interested in contemporary cultural studies, and in particular in the interactions between literature and music. Other: Freelance musician, a flutist specialized in... Full Profile »

missing portrait

Rebecca A Ewing, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish; Coordinator Spanish 1/2

Office: 2016 Campus Drive, Office #201

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: 919-684-2715

Fax: 919-684-9655

Office Hours: Monday: 11:00-12:00 Tuesday 12:00-1:00 Or by appointment

Bridging the Language-Literature Divide in University content courses: A study on the Oral Proficiency of university Spanish majors and how to improve these students oral proficiency. Full Profile »

missing portrait

Ana Fernandez, Lecturing Fellow; Spanish

Office: 2016 Campus Drive #103

Campus Box: Box 90269

Phone: (919) 684-4224

Office Hours: Mondays: 4:00-5:00 PM Wednesdays: 3:00-4:00 PM And by appointment

Full Profile »

Bethzaida Fernández, Lecturer, Spanish; Coordinator - Spanish 203 (Fall 2013)

Office: 2016 Campus Drive, Office #206

Campus Box: 90269

Phone: 919-684-4346

Fax: (919) 684-4029

Master Thesis: Role of Attitudes and Motivation in Second Language Acquisition. Full Profile »

missing portrait

Rosa Ibanez, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish

Office: 2016 Campus Drive #102

Phone: (919) 684-8628

Full Profile »

missing portrait

Harry Karahalios, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish

Office: 2016 Campus Drive #102

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: 919-684-4875

Fax: 919-684-9655

Office Hours: Monday & Wednesday - 10:30 -11:30a.m.

He works in contemporary peninsular Spanish and Greek literature and film, exploring the transition of both countries from the twentieth to the twenty-first century through the prisms of immigration and cultural diversity. His broader scholarly and teaching interests include theories of nationalism, national and transnational cinemas, as well as migration and diaspora studies. Full Profile »

Lisa M. Merschel, Lecturer, Spanish; Assistant Director, Spanish Language Prog

Office: 2016 Campus Drive

Campus Box: 90269

Phone: (919) 684-8435

Fax: 919-684-9655

Web site

Full Profile »

Joan Munné, Lecturer, Spanish; Assistant Director of the Spanish Language Program

Office: 2016 Campus Drive

Phone: 919-684-4077

Fax: 919-684-9655

Office Hours: Wednesdays: 10:00am - 12:00pm

His areas of interest include: Second language acquisition, second Language instruction and assessment, language-learning technologies, teacher training, Spanish variation, language in contact and bilingualism, Spanish in the USA, Spanish for Heritage Speakers, cultural studies, service-Learning pedagogy, etc. His present research focuses on testing, vocabulary acquisition, the influence of technology in the process of writing for language learners in the 21rst century, and also the... Full Profile »

missing portrait

Luis Navarro Roncero, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish

Office: 2016 Campus Drive #102

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: (919) 684-4294

Fax: (919) 684-4029

Full Profile »

missing portrait

Maria Romero, Lecturing Fellow, Spanish

Office: 2016 Campus Drive #201

Campus Box: 90257

Phone: 919-684-4624

Fax: 919-684-9655

Full Profile »

Melissa Simmermeyer, Lecturer, Spanish; Coordinator SP 301

Office: 2016 Campus Drive, #206

Campus Box: 90269

Phone: (919) 684-4877

Fax: (919) 684-9655

Full Profile »

Graciela Vidal, Lecturing Fellow; Coordinator Spanish 105/106A

Office: 2016 Campus Drive #101

Campus Box: 90269

Phone: (919) 684-4294

Fax: 919-684-4029

Office Hours: TBA

Full Profile »

missing portrait

William J. Villalba, Lecturing Fellow; Spanish

Office: 2016 Campus Drive, Office #106

Campus Box: 90269

Phone: 919-684-4876

Fax: 919-684-9655

Office Hours: Fall 2014: Wednesdays & Fridays 2:15-3:15 p.m. or by appointment

William J. Villalba was born in Caracas, Venezuela. He received his Licenciatura en Artes, Mención Música from the Universidad Central de Venezuela. He came to the U.S. in 1989. William received his M.A. from Emory University and his doctorate in Spanish American Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2006. His dissertation was titled: From Indigenismo to Testimonio: Peruvian Intellectuals, Globalization, and the Politics of Knowledge. William is currently working... Full Profile »

In 2004 the Spanish Service-Learning Program was created with a grant from the Duke Clinical Research Institute. The focus is to build learning opportunities and connections with the Latino/a community. Over the years we have partnered with more than fifteen different community organizations in Durham and the surrounding area.

The Service-Learning courses taught in Spanish strive to create opportunities wherein students may be enriched by experiences in the community as they advance in their Spanish studies. The course offerings complement the other service-learning courses across campus. As Duke advances its mission to build civic engagement, Romance Studies is well-represented and is touted as a model program within this endeavor.

The Mariposa Book series was created during a three year project in which Duke students interviewed and collected stories from Latino/a elementary school students in Durham, NC. These coloring books may be downloaded and used as bilingual resources for your community. Teachers will find activiites for various grade levels that explore the issues presented in the books.

For more information on community engagement activiites within Community-Based Language Initiatives see: Duke Service-Learning CBLI.

For more information on Service-Learning, please contact Joan Clifford (919) 684-0774.

Club Pura Vida

Club Pura Vida is a Spanish conversation group that meets several times during the academic year on campus. The meetings are open to all Duke students and the broader community at all level of proficiency. All are welcome to come, share some food, and join in the casual conversation and cultural exchange in a relaxed setting that encourages interaction and discovery. Come practice your Spanish among friends, music and food! Bring a friend!

For more information on Club Pura Vida, please contact the Spanish Cultural Advisor: Bethzaida Fernández-Vargas, Spanish Lecturer, 2016 Campus Drive, Phone: 919-684-4346, bfv67@duke.edu.

Sabrosura

Sabrosura is Duke's Latin dance troupe and an independent cultural establishment that retains amicable relations with its mother organization, Mi Gente. The crux of Sabrosura's mission revolves around a deep-seated desire to utilize the medium of performance art as a tool for the preservation and enhancement of multiculturalism at Duke and within the neighboring Durham community. Sabrosura specializes in a wide variety of dance forms including, but not limited to: salsa, merengue, bachata, cha cha, tango, flamenco, samba, reggaeton, lambada, and cumbia.

Website: http://www.duke.edu/web/dukesabro/